TIM-1 SBC

Christian Ortner (mister-freeze at the VzEkC e. V. forum build a SBC with expansion around a TIM IC.
Here is his projects description of the TIM-1 SBC. TIM-1 OverviewSchematic, images, hex listing of Lunar Lander!

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TIM-1 SBC

Christian Ortner (mister-freeze at the VzEkC e. V. forum buold a SBC with expansion around a TIM IC.
Here is his projects description of the TIM-1 SBC.

Since the TIM chip is actually not available, the TIM-1 is unfortunately only useful for people who are in possession of a 6530-004. But, there is still the TIM-2 😉 The idea for the project came up when I got a few MPS 6530-004 by chance. Actually I always wanted to have an affordable KIM-1, but so far I haven’t found one. I also wanted to learn how to use KiCad.


The RRIOT 6530-004 (TIM chip) was sold by MOS only as a kit in the form of the TIM chip, a manual and a schematic. This meant that the computer enthusiast or developer had to assemble the rest of the system themselves. Commercially, the TIM chip was probably only used in the Jolt and Super Jolt. It was not until the KIM-1 that MOS released a complete development and learning system.

TIM-1

With the TIM-1 project a SBC should be created, as authentic and as exact as possible after the original circuit diagram for the TIM chip of MOS. So for the TIM-1 -at least for the mainboard- only those parts should be used which were included in the MOS schematic and by the way only those parts which were available in the mid seventies. The design is based on the KIM-1 and other SBCs from that time. The layout is adapted to the original schematic, i.e. the parts can be found at the same place where they are placed in the schematic. This makes it easy to understand the system from the schematic. The TIM-1 needs 5 V supply voltage. If you use the EIA (RS232) interface, you have to supply -12V and +12V additionally. For the current loop (Teletype) there is an additional -10V supply required, but it can be assumed that -12V is also possible (maybe a Resistor must be changed). The transistor -according to the original schematic- PN2709A is probably a typing error. The PN 2907A will surely be the correct one. For simplified use with a modern terminal emulator the serial interface is led out laterally as TTl level. This allows the system to operate using only 5V and a USB to TTL adapter. The address decoding for the selection of RAM and RRIOT is incomplete, therefore there is a multiple selection over the whole address range. Therefore, when using the expansion card, an external disabling line for the internal RAM and the TIM chip is necessary to avoid address overlaps. Surely this could have been improved right away, but the TIM-1 should be expandable but, as far as possible, conform to the plan of MOS. The 4 SRAMs 2111 (256×4) on the board provide the user with 512 bytes (page 0 and 1). For small programs and for getting to know the TIM-1 this is very sufficient, but for more extensive programs this is of course too little. Therefore, the TIM-1 has received a simple memory expansion. This external card can be equipped with 8 pieces of RAM or EPROM (probably also modern EEPROM) with standard 2k x 8 (e.g. 2016 RAM and 2716 Eprom). A 4kx8 EPROM 2732 can be used as well, here the upper or lower 2 kB must be selected by jumper.

The operation of the TIM-1 is almost completely covered with the TIM manual from MOS.
Since the TIM chip is actually not available, the TIM-1 is unfortunately only useful for people who are in possession of a 6530-004. But, there is still the TIM-2 😉 The idea for the project came up when I got a few MPS 6530-004 by chance. Actually I always wanted to have an affordable KIM-1, but so far I haven’t found one. I also wanted to learn how to use KiCad.

TIM-1 Overview


TIM-1 Setup with Terminal and Papertape


TIM-1 running Lunarlander


TIM 1 Memory and Slot Card

TIM-1 with Expansion

TIM-1 Schematic
TIM-1 Memory MAP
TIM-1 Memory Expansion Card

TIM-1 running Lunarlander

LUNARLANDER for 6502 and TIM

LUNAR LANDER for the 6502

HEX File from Mark Garetz´s Listing in Dr. Dobb´s Journal (August 1976).
Just typed in with a little debugging by Christian Ortner in 2023

KIM-1 and TIM updates

I have added the following to the KIM-2 KIM-3-KIM-4 KIM-5 KIM-6 pages:

– brochure with photos and descriptions and pricelist KIM System Products
– photos of KIM-2 and KIM4 with KIM-4 motherboard with KIM-3b, KIM-5, KIM-6
– brochure TIM System Development Aid with pricelist

The brochure of KIM-5 etc is from Commodore, the KIM-2 RAM was already dropped for a higher capacity KIM-3B. The KIM-5 was still mentioned as product. Alas I have never seen or heard of a KIM-5 in the hands of a user. So the ROMS are lost alas.

KIM-4 with KIM-3B, KIM-5, KIM-6

Who were involved in the development of KIM-1 and TIM?

The 6530-002 (the KIM monitor), 6530-003 (the KIM tape routines) and 6530-004 (TIM, the teletype monitor) are in the ROM of these IC’s. Developed in/for/by MOS Technology.

For TIM the Story of TIM (DEMON as Ray Holt called it) tells about Manny Lomas.

It would be nice to know more who did hardware and software design for the KIM-1 (must have been a small team since they are so intertwined) of these innovative early 6502 development.

The story should start with Chuck Peddle and his team. They developed the 6502 and supporting IC’s like 6530 (RRIOT) and 6532 (RIOT).

The story of KIM talks about Don McLaughlin, MOS Technology founder and engineering manager of the project. Peddle and a programming manager named Bob Winterhalt agreed with the idea and the three men began the design. According to MOS Technology employee Al Charpentier, John May did the actual design.

Superjolt manuals and schematics

I have added Superjolt manuals and schematics to the Jolt pages

Datac 1000 more information

Added some photo’s, a good schematic and user group newsletters to page devoted to the DATAC 1000, a small TIM-1 (6530-004) system, a very early 6502 SBC, as used by the Philadelphia based PACS users, manufactured by Datac engineering.

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HDE card cage, floppy drive

Hudson Digital Electronics Inc

Known by advertisments in the KIM-1/User Notes.


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Books for the 6502: KIM-1 and more

KIM-1, AIM-65, SYM-1 and other 6502/65C02/65C816 related books.

A mix of English, German and Dutch books.

On my bookshelf I have quite a collection of books on the 6502 family.

Note that manuals and books that come with systems are shown on the pages of the corresponding system!

Microprocessor Systems Engineering
R.C. Camp, T.A. Smay, C.J. Triska
AIM 65 System 65 parts
6502 Software Gourmet Guide and Cookbook
6502 Users Manual
AIM 65 Laboratory Manual And Study Guide
Anwendunsgbeispiele fĂťr den Microprozessor 6502
Microprocessor_Fundamentals KIM-1
Best of Micro Volume 1 1978
Best of Micro Volume 2 1979
Best of MICRO 3, AIM 65 SYM-1 KIM-1 part June 1979 May 1980
Compute’s Machine Language for Beginners
Compute’s The Second Book of Machine Language
Programming a Microcomputer 6502
Programmieren von Mikrocomputern CPU 6502 (Skriptum)
How to Build a Microcomputer .. and really Understand It!
Mikrocomputer ohne Ballast
Micro Principles KIM-1 user guide chapter 8
Digitaalschakelen met de KIM-1
6502 Assembly Language Programming
6502 Programmieren in ASSEMBLER
Microcomputer Experimentation with the MOS Technology KIM-1
6502 Machinetaal Subroutines
6502 Assembly Language Subroutines
Microcomputer experimentation with the AIM 65
Machine Language Programming Cookbook part 1
Machine Code for Beginners
Microcomputer Systems Principles Featuring the 6502 KIM
Beyond Games: System Software for your 6502 Personal Computer
Assembly Language Programming
Using 6502 Assembly Language
6502 Machine Code for Humans
Programming the 65816 including the 6502, 65C02 and the 65802
Programming the 65816 including the 6502, 65C02 and the 65802
Forth Programming
Programming the 65816
Programming and Interfacing the 6502 with Experiments
Synertek 1981-1982 Data Catalog
Synertek DataBook 1983
Third Book of OSI
TSC 6502 Games Package 1
TV Typewriter Cookbook
Zaks 6502 Anwendungen
6502 Games
6502 Applications
Advanced 6502 Programming
Fortgeschrittene 6502 Programmierung
Programmierung des 6502
Programming the 6502
6502 Applications book
Programmeren van de 6502
Microprocessor Interfacing Techniques
Microprocessor Concepts and Applications
Publisher: Lab-Volt
6502 Assembler-Kurs fĂźr Beginner
6502 Machine Code For Beginners
A low-lvel language for use on the MOS 6502 Microcomputer
6502 Microcomputer Programmierung
Programmieren in Maschinensprache 6502
The Giant Handbook of Computer Projects
First Book of KIM
The First Book of KIM-1 in PDF format
The First Book of KIM-1, part in text format
The First Book of KIM-1 in HTML format
Sources of The First Book of KIM-1 in source and papertape format, Jeff Tranter
First Book of KIM-1 for SYM-1
Rockwell ProduktĂźbersicht in deutsch
Rockwell Microelectronic Data Devices Catalog 1979
1981 Rockwell Electronic Devices Division Data Book
1984 Rockwell Data Book
1985 Rockwell Data Book
1987 Rockwell Controller Products Databook

Datac 1000, a TIM 6502 SBC from 1976

This single board computer was premiered at the club’s August 1976 meeting in Atlantic City, NJ. Once “perfected,” the computer helped introduce many PACS members, and others,to the field of microcomputers. The official manufacturer of this computer was Datac Engineering of Southampton, PA.The computer was available in two models: the $185 “tutorial” version and the fully populated and tested version for $345.In either case the 6502 CPU was included. Computer was instantly usable and featured expansion capabilities, touch sensitive input keypads and a documentation package.The computer was so revolutionary that it was featured in Byte Magazine’s July 1977 edition.

Photos and information thanks to https://oldcomputermuseum.com and https://www.kennettclassic.com/

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Datac 1000, a TIM 6502 SBC

The DATAC 1000, a single-board computer based upon a 6502 and a TIM RRIOT, designed in 1976 by Philadelphia Area Computer Society club members Carmen DiCamillo and Roland James.

This single board computer was premiered at the club’s August 1976 meeting in Atlantic City, NJ. Once “perfected,” the computer helped introduce many PACS members, and others,
to the field of microcomputers. The official manufacturer of this computer was Datac Engineering of Southampton, PA.
The computer was available in two models: the $185 “tutorial” version and the fully populated and tested version for $345.
In either case the 6502 CPU was included. Computer was instantly usable and featured expansion capabilities, touch sensitive input keypads and a documentation package.
The computer was so revolutionary that it was featured in Byte Magazine’s July 1977 edition.

Photos and information thanks to https://oldcomputermuseum.com and https://www.kennettclassic.com/ and intagecomputer.net

DATAC 1000 by Datac Engineering 1976

– CPU MOS 6502 1 MHz
– RAM 1K (2111 SRAM)
– RRIOT TIM 6530-004 for serial I/O and ROM
– I/O ports with a PIA 6520
– tape interface, bus expansion, serial (to connect to a terminal)
– Touch-sensitive pads 27 LEDs
– Power supply external 9 VDC PSU

Downloads:

Datac 1000 schematic
Datac 1000 brochure
Datac 1000 User group 09 1977
Datac 1000 User group 03 1978
PACS The Data bus vol 1 no 1 July 1976

Schematic of Datac 1000



Byte July 1977


Roy Brade with his expanded Datac 1000