AIM 65

AIM 65 was Rockwells SBC in the tradiotion of KIM-1 and VIM/SYM-1, sharing the Applicatioonand Expansion connector designs, so add-ons could be used on all three. The Keypad/LED was replaced with a full keybaord and 20 character display, making it more a desktop computer than a SBC.

The Rockwell AIM-65 computer was a development computer introduced in 1978 based on the MOS Technology 6502 microprocessor. Available software included a line-oriented machine code monitor, BASIC interpreter, assembler, Pascal, PL/65, and FORTH development system. Later developments were the AIM 65/40 (40 character display, memory banks) and the RM 65 card based development system. After 1984 Rockwell stopoped with the AIM 65 and RM 65 product lines.

Advanced Interactive Monitor is a SBC with a 6502 at 1 MHz, 1-4K RAM, 20 colums alphanumeric display, full ASCII keyboard.

AIM 65 Manuals and software
My AIM 65s
AIM 65 Interactive newsletter
Application Notes, datasheets, other articles and AIM 65/40 information
RM 65 modular card based modules

Technical specifications
– Built-in full sized QWERTY keyboard
– 20 character alphanumeric LED display (16 segments)
– Integrated 20 character thermal printer
– 20mA current-loop serial interface (can be adapted to RS232)
– Expansion connector (KIM-1 compatible)
– Application connector with 6522 VIA chip
– 4 KB RAM
– 5 sockets for 4 KB ROM/EPROM chips

The AIM memory map is:
$0000-$9FFF: RAM (early Rockwell versions only had $0000-$0FFF on board).
$A000-$AFFF: I/O & scratchpad memory; some areas can be made available for more RAM.
$B000-$CFFF: Optional Language ROMs (BASIC, Forth, PL/65, Pascal).
$D000-$DFFF: Optional Assembler or Mathpack
$E000-$FFFF: Firmware and monitor program

Rockwell produced the AIM 65 until 1985, and manufactured by Dynatem under license in early 1986 after Rockwell had ceased production. Though the Revision 4 AIM 65 is quite similar to earlier iterations, the subsequent Revision 5 hardware features a redesigned clock generator and support for newer RAM and ROM IC types which became available over the production lifespan of the AIM 65. Relative to Rockwell-manufactured examples, the Dynatem AIM 65 is quite rare. See the Manuals and Software page for circuit diagrams revisions.


De PC 100 getest
, an article by me, Hans Otten, August 1980, in Radio Bulletin about the Siemens PC100, an AIM 65 with a case, german documentation and sold by Siemens, Brutech in the Netherlands.