TIM-1 SBC

Christian Ortner (mister-freeze at the VzEkC e. V. forum build a SBC with expansion around a TIM IC.
Here is his projects description of the TIM-1 SBC. TIM-1 OverviewSchematic, images, hex listing of Lunar Lander!

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TIM-1 SBC

Christian Ortner (mister-freeze at the VzEkC e. V. forum buold a SBC with expansion around a TIM IC.
Here is his projects description of the TIM-1 SBC.

Since the TIM chip is actually not available, the TIM-1 is unfortunately only useful for people who are in possession of a 6530-004. But, there is still the TIM-2 😉 The idea for the project came up when I got a few MPS 6530-004 by chance. Actually I always wanted to have an affordable KIM-1, but so far I haven’t found one. I also wanted to learn how to use KiCad.


The RRIOT 6530-004 (TIM chip) was sold by MOS only as a kit in the form of the TIM chip, a manual and a schematic. This meant that the computer enthusiast or developer had to assemble the rest of the system themselves. Commercially, the TIM chip was probably only used in the Jolt and Super Jolt. It was not until the KIM-1 that MOS released a complete development and learning system.

TIM-1

With the TIM-1 project a SBC should be created, as authentic and as exact as possible after the original circuit diagram for the TIM chip of MOS. So for the TIM-1 -at least for the mainboard- only those parts should be used which were included in the MOS schematic and by the way only those parts which were available in the mid seventies. The design is based on the KIM-1 and other SBCs from that time. The layout is adapted to the original schematic, i.e. the parts can be found at the same place where they are placed in the schematic. This makes it easy to understand the system from the schematic. The TIM-1 needs 5 V supply voltage. If you use the EIA (RS232) interface, you have to supply -12V and +12V additionally. For the current loop (Teletype) there is an additional -10V supply required, but it can be assumed that -12V is also possible (maybe a Resistor must be changed). The transistor -according to the original schematic- PN2709A is probably a typing error. The PN 2907A will surely be the correct one. For simplified use with a modern terminal emulator the serial interface is led out laterally as TTl level. This allows the system to operate using only 5V and a USB to TTL adapter. The address decoding for the selection of RAM and RRIOT is incomplete, therefore there is a multiple selection over the whole address range. Therefore, when using the expansion card, an external disabling line for the internal RAM and the TIM chip is necessary to avoid address overlaps. Surely this could have been improved right away, but the TIM-1 should be expandable but, as far as possible, conform to the plan of MOS. The 4 SRAMs 2111 (256×4) on the board provide the user with 512 bytes (page 0 and 1). For small programs and for getting to know the TIM-1 this is very sufficient, but for more extensive programs this is of course too little. Therefore, the TIM-1 has received a simple memory expansion. This external card can be equipped with 8 pieces of RAM or EPROM (probably also modern EEPROM) with standard 2k x 8 (e.g. 2016 RAM and 2716 Eprom). A 4kx8 EPROM 2732 can be used as well, here the upper or lower 2 kB must be selected by jumper.

The operation of the TIM-1 is almost completely covered with the TIM manual from MOS.
Since the TIM chip is actually not available, the TIM-1 is unfortunately only useful for people who are in possession of a 6530-004. But, there is still the TIM-2 😉 The idea for the project came up when I got a few MPS 6530-004 by chance. Actually I always wanted to have an affordable KIM-1, but so far I haven’t found one. I also wanted to learn how to use KiCad.

TIM-1 Overview


TIM-1 Setup with Terminal and Papertape


TIM-1 running Lunarlander


TIM 1 Memory and Slot Card

TIM-1 with Expansion

TIM-1 Schematic
TIM-1 Memory MAP
TIM-1 Memory Expansion Card

TIM-1 running Lunarlander

LUNARLANDER for 6502 and TIM

LUNAR LANDER for the 6502

HEX File from Mark Garetz´s Listing in Dr. Dobb´s Journal (August 1976).
Just typed in with a little debugging by Christian Ortner in 2023

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AIM 65 clones by Peter Renaud

a reduced version AIM-65 Mini
micro AIM-65 version 2

For AIM 65 ROMS and manuals, see the AIM 65 pages!

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Replace both 6530s in KIM-1

Eduardo Casino has designed with modern tools, like Kicad and image software Inkscape a PCB for the KIM-1 which is as close as he could get to a Rev D.

This of course brought up the issue of how to get the 6530-002 and 6520-003 for this board, since those are unobtainable since a long time.
That can be solved with a FPGA. Or with a fast microcontroller like the Teensy, that is already proofed to be a good 6502 and more emulator (MCL65+).

As a first step Eduardo designed a PCB that is placed on top of the KIM-1. The 6530-002 and -003 need to be replaced with IC sockets, the PCB inserts in these sockets. It is like the Corsham 6530 replacement board, but now for both 6530s.

The style of the PCB is adapted to the syle of original KIM-1 and Eduardo’s reproduction, with curved lines.

Details, gerbers, Kicad project, at Eduardo Casino’s github page.
(the design has not been tested yet!)


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KIM-1 rev D PCB redesign Eduardo Casino

Eduardo Casino has designed with modern tools, like Kicad and image software Inkscape a PCB for the KIM-1 which is as close as he could get to a Rev D.

Based upon images on the Revisions pages on this site.
(the design has not been tested yet!)

On this forum64.de thread he published the design, and made all available on his github pages.

RRIOT testing Breadboard Test for 6530-002

This article is written by Jeff M. Nay, about his experiments to restore a KIM-1 to working order, testing the 6530-002 RRIOT with his own KIM-1.
The challenge was to address the second 6530-002 in this setup at another address then the onboard 6530-002 RRIOT.
The experiment was a success, the 6530-002 is indeed in a bad state, the ROM is corrupt and it had to be replaced.

The KIM-1, from a friend, was in a bad state. The repair was a success also. He was able to get this old KIM-1 working again, after only having to replace, the 6502 CPU, the 6530-002 RRIOT Chip with a Corsham 6530 Replacement board, all 8 Memory Chips and the U17 7406 inverter.

Read more in the group: KIM-1 – Google Groups

Breadboard Test for 6530-002

Attach Breadboard to working KIM-1, using Expansion Port and using K4 and K2 from Application Port (Corsham Application Board)
NOTE: Turn all SW1 switches on CORSHAM Board Off (Or data will repeat at K1,K2,K3,K4)

I started by wiring the data lines on the 6530 to the expansion board pins 15-8.
Then the address lines to pins A-L.
Now it is just a matter of wiring the control lines correctly.

  • I have phase 2, pin 3 of the 6530 going to pin U of the Expansion board (Yellow)
  • I have pin 4 (RSO) of the 6530 going to (K4) of my Corsham Application Board – (Don’t forget pull up resistor) (Blue)
  • I have RES pin 16 of the 6530 wired to pin 7 (RST) of the Expansion board
  • I have pin 18, (CS1) on the 6530. Going to (K2) of my Corsham Application Board – (Don’t forget pull up resistor) (White)
  • I have Power going to pin 20 and Gnd going to pin 1

You should be able to read ROM at $1000

Looking below at the data sheet, where the address of the I/O and RAM are determined by A9-A6. This means it is not hard set for $1700 or $1740.
K5 ($1400) + A9-A6 determines where the IO of both 6530s will start and end.

I ended up using K2, which starts at $0800 + A9-A6 means my I/O registers should start at $0B40 for the 6530-002 or $0B00 for the 6530-003
I also use K4 for the ROM section of the 6530-002 which starts the ROM section at $1000


Onboard 6530s
6530-003

A9+A8 = 1100000000 = 300H to 1100111111 = 33FH
(K5) $1400+$300 Start the IO for 6530-003 at $1700.
(K5) $1400+$33F End the IO for 6530-003 at $173F

6530-002

A9+A8+A6 =1101000000=340H to 1101111111=37FH
(K5) $1400+$340 Start the IO for 6530-002 at $1740
(k5) $1400+$37F End the IO for 6530-002 at $177F

Bread Board 6530-002
6530-003

A9+A8=1100000000 =300H to 1100111111=33FH
(K2) $0800+$300 Start the IO for 6530-003 at $0B00.
(K2) $1400+$33F End the IO for 6530-003 at $0B3F

6530-002

A9+A8+A6=1101000000=340H to 1101111111=37FH
(K2) $1400+$340 Start the IO for 6530-002 at $0B40
(K2) $1400+$37F End the IO for 6530-002 at $0B7F


This is the ROM of 6530-002 breadboard being accessed at $1000 (85)

The now working KIM-1:

 

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Books for the 6502: KIM-1 and more

KIM-1, AIM-65, SYM-1 and other 6502/65C02/65C816 related books.

A mix of English, German and Dutch books.

On my bookshelf I have quite a collection of books on the 6502 family.

Note that manuals and books that come with systems are shown on the pages of the corresponding system!

Microprocessor Systems Engineering
R.C. Camp, T.A. Smay, C.J. Triska
AIM 65 System 65 parts
6502 Software Gourmet Guide and Cookbook
6502 Users Manual
AIM 65 Laboratory Manual And Study Guide
Anwendunsgbeispiele fĂťr den Microprozessor 6502
Microprocessor_Fundamentals KIM-1
Best of Micro Volume 1 1978
Best of Micro Volume 2 1979
Best of MICRO 3, AIM 65 SYM-1 KIM-1 part June 1979 May 1980
Compute’s Machine Language for Beginners
Compute’s The Second Book of Machine Language
Programming a Microcomputer 6502
Programmieren von Mikrocomputern CPU 6502 (Skriptum)
How to Build a Microcomputer .. and really Understand It!
Mikrocomputer ohne Ballast
Micro Principles KIM-1 user guide chapter 8
Digitaalschakelen met de KIM-1
6502 Assembly Language Programming
6502 Programmieren in ASSEMBLER
Microcomputer Experimentation with the MOS Technology KIM-1
6502 Machinetaal Subroutines
6502 Assembly Language Subroutines
Microcomputer experimentation with the AIM 65
Machine Language Programming Cookbook part 1
Machine Code for Beginners
Microcomputer Systems Principles Featuring the 6502 KIM
Beyond Games: System Software for your 6502 Personal Computer
Assembly Language Programming
Using 6502 Assembly Language
6502 Machine Code for Humans
Programming the 65816 including the 6502, 65C02 and the 65802
Programming the 65816 including the 6502, 65C02 and the 65802
Forth Programming
Programming the 65816
Programming and Interfacing the 6502 with Experiments
Synertek 1981-1982 Data Catalog
Synertek DataBook 1983
Third Book of OSI
TSC 6502 Games Package 1
TV Typewriter Cookbook
Zaks 6502 Anwendungen
6502 Games
6502 Applications
Advanced 6502 Programming
Fortgeschrittene 6502 Programmierung
Programmierung des 6502
Programming the 6502
6502 Applications book
Programmeren van de 6502
Microprocessor Interfacing Techniques
Microprocessor Concepts and Applications
Publisher: Lab-Volt
6502 Assembler-Kurs fĂźr Beginner
6502 Machine Code For Beginners
A low-lvel language for use on the MOS 6502 Microcomputer
6502 Microcomputer Programmierung
Programmieren in Maschinensprache 6502
The Giant Handbook of Computer Projects
First Book of KIM
The First Book of KIM-1 in PDF format
The First Book of KIM-1, part in text format
The First Book of KIM-1 in HTML format
Sources of The First Book of KIM-1 in source and papertape format, Jeff Tranter
First Book of KIM-1 for SYM-1
Rockwell ProduktĂźbersicht in deutsch
Rockwell Microelectronic Data Devices Catalog 1979
1981 Rockwell Electronic Devices Division Data Book
1984 Rockwell Data Book
1985 Rockwell Data Book
1987 Rockwell Controller Products Databook

Commodore Chessmate: a 6530 computer

The Chessmate is a 6530 – KIM-1 like computer. Keyboard, LED display are used as in the KIM-1. Peter Jennings, who designed this chess computer with Commodore, build upon his Microchess 1. from the KIM-1, and used the extra ROM space to enhance it to Microchess 1.5: more chess features, a chess clock, sounds, dedicated keys, status LEDs.

The 6530-024 delivers the I/O and timer and RAM used by the Chessmate, the RRIOT ROM is not used by the main ROM. The dumped ROM of the 6530 (see below) contains no recognizable data or program,

It will not be that difficult to ‘clone’ this chess computer with the information here. A 6532 can easily take the role of the 6530. A 6502 instead of a 6504, same SRAM< a 2732 or similar ROM. The ROMs  are dumped, both for an Chessmate and a Novag Chess Champion MK I

Schematic, user manual, dumped ROMs here.

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Commodore Chessmate: 6530-024 RRIOT

The Chessmate is a 6530 – KIM-1 like computer. Keyboard, LED display are used as in the KIM-1. Peter Jennings, who designed this chess computer with Commodore, build upon his Microchess 1. from the KIM-1, and used the extra ROM space to enhance it to Microchess 1.5: more chess features, a chess clock, sounds, dedicated keys, status LEDs.

The 6530-024 delivers the I/O and timer and RAM used by the Chessmate, the RRIOT ROM is not used by the main ROM. The dumped ROM (see below) contains no recognizable data or program, I would not trust this dump.

It will not be that difficult to ‘clone’ this chess computer with the information here. A 6532 can easily take the role of the 6530. A 6502 instead of a 6504, some SRAM, a 2732 or similar ROM. The ROM itself is dumped, see below.

Technical specifications

  • MOS MPS 6504 1 MHz 4 KB ROM 320 bytes RAM total
  • 6530-0024 RRIOT (of which I/O lines, timer and 64 bytes RAM are used, ROM is irrelevant
  • 256 SRAM (2x 2111)
  • 4K ROM (6332)
  • Display: Four 7 Segment LED type (which indicates either the move or the time)
  • 19 membrane keys
  • LEDs for Check, Chessmate, or whether the computer is playing black or white
  • Eight skill levels
  • Piezo loudspeaker for 14 Electronic sounds
  • Built-in chess clock
  • The computer has 32 International standard openings in its memory and tries to follow them for 16 moves
  • Chessmate plays black or white
  • Can verify position of pieces at any stage of the game
  • En passant and castling
  • Playing strength (DWZ/ELO): ca. 1050

Related, identical specifications and hardware, and (probably) the same software:

  • Novag Chess Champion MK II (A)
  • Novag Chess Champion MK II (B)
  • TEC Schachcomputer

Memory map (deduced from source of Novag MKII and hardware schematic, note that for the 6504 used this is collapsed to the smaller address space 0000-1FFF.
$8B00 RRIOT I/O
$0000 – $01FF RAM 256 bytes, stack and zeropage mirrored
$F000 – $FFFF ROM
$EC00 – $EFFF RRIOT ROM unused in main ROM
$8B80 – RRIOT RAM 64 byte

Commodore Chessmate manual
Another Commodore Chessmate manual
ROMs of early Commodore Chessmate, in two 2K parts
ROMs of Novag Chess Champion MK II
Novag Chess Champion MKII manual
Partially commented source of the ROM of Chessmate

Commodore Chessnmate, note the location of the option ROM



Photo by Commodore International Historical Society on twitter @commodoreihs

Photo by Commodore International Historical Society on twitter @commodoreihs

Photo by Commodore International Historical Society on twitter @commodoreihs

On this early Chessmate two ROMs were used, each 2K. The TTL IC on the top right was added manually and wirewrapped, the wires running from it to the ROM selection inputs.

Novag Chess Champion MK II A and B



TEC schachcomputer

KIM-1 Diagnostic board

Dwight Elvey designed and programmed a diagnostic board for the KIM-1, to determine what might be wrong with the KIM-1
The board switches off the 6530 ROMs and one can run tests on teh onboard ROM, looking for for defective RAM, defective LED display, defective 6530 ports.

Here I present the complete design of the board, with help and permission of Dwight Elvey, Santo Nucifora and Liu Ganning.